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Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

08/13/19

END DATE

08/12/21

FOCUS AREAS

Safety

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE
SPONSORS

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Christopher Day

Affiliate Researcher

About the research

Right-turn-on-red (RTOR) has been used in the US for several decades, beginning in California as early as 1937, before being adopted by most states during the energy crisis of the 1970s. In current practice, allowance of RTOR is the default assumption by most drivers, with local prohibitions noted by use of the NO TURN ON RED sign, and area-wide prohibitions in certain local jurisdictions (such as in New York City).

There are several significant gaps in tools available to practitioners regarding RTOR, which are present in current guidance documents. The most fundamental of these is guidance on whether RTOR should be permitted or prohibited at a location. The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) lists six conditions where a NO TURN ON RED sign should be used.

Some of these conditions, such as sight distance, are unambiguous, but others such as geometric and operational characteristics are more open to judgment. Other guidance documents have included their own statements regarding RTOR, but these also stop short of offering a unified method for determining whether to prohibit RTOR.

The research team offers a vision of execution that includes three key elements that they believe can result in outcomes that are highly transferable, versatile, and which will lead to greatly accelerated implementation into practice. This includes approaches to data collection, modeling, and implementation that each provide novel contributions to the analysis of RTOR volumes, and perhaps to capacity analysis more generally.

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

06/06/19

END DATE

12/05/20

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE
SPONSORS

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Shauna Hallmark

Director, InTrans

About the research

Connected and autonomous vehicle (CAV) technologies hold the potential to produce a number of safety, mobility, and environmental benefits for the users and operators of the nation’s surface transportation system. The benefits of connected vehicle technologies are expected to be wideranging and apply not only to roadway users but also transportation agencies. These benefits include reduced crashes, improved mobility, lower emissions, a reduced need to construct roadway infrastructure (fostered by mobility improvements), among others. However, the advent of a fully-integrated CAV system is not expected to come online for at least 20 years due to turnover in the existing vehicle fleet. As a result, infrastructure will need to be maintained for human drivers as well as CAVs for some time. Additionally autonomous vehicle (AV) technology is being developed by private industry regardless of the state of current infrastructure. As such, AV technology is heavily based on 360 degree awareness in close proximity of the vehicle and not heavily integrated with the provided infrastructure. Yet, demonstrations by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) and others have shown that significant benefits to safety will require that AV technology operate with connectivity between vehicles, based on the basic safety message (BSM), and communications with roadside infrastructure.

The USDOT publication and outreach in deploying Preparing for the Future of Transportation: Automated Vehicle 3.0 makes it very clear that the federal government’s role will focus on vehicle safety and will not employ blanket regulation, which makes the likely progression of vehicle technology driven by cost of vehicle turnover for private owners and market forces for shared vehicle owners/operators.

The need to maintain a dual system that serves regular drivers and CAVs for some time to an acceptable level of service coupled with uncertainty in the direction of CAV technology creates an additional maintenance burden for agencies who already have constrained workforces and budgets. Compounding this is that changing maintenance needs will require a different set of workforce skills than is currently available in most transportation agencies.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

PROJECT NUMBER

NCHRP 10-85

START DATE

03/08/11

END DATE

07/31/13

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CMAT, CTRE
SPONSORS

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Doug Gransberg

Affiliate Researcher

Co-Principal Investigator
Jennifer Shane

Director, CMAT

About the research

Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) project delivery is an integrated team approach to the planning, design, and construction of a highway project, to control schedule and budget, and to assure quality for the project owner. The team consists of the owner, the designer, which might be an in-house engineer, and the at-risk construction manager. The aim of this project delivery method is to engage at-risk construction expertise early in the design process to enhance constructability, manage risk, and facilitate concurrent execution of design and construction without the owner giving up control over the details of design as it would in a design-build project. The objective of this research is to address the needs for CMGC guidance for evolving alternative project delivery methods. The research documents the results of a survey of state DOTs (response rate of 84 percent), a content analysis of 50 CMGC solicitation documents, and 10 case studies of CMGC projects. The research yielded a set of CMGC delivery models that are specifically adapted for DOT projects, not a regurgitation of the models in use in vertical construction. The models are described in a Guidebook for initiating and implementing a CMGC project delivery system for highway projects at transportation agencies.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

09/30/13

END DATE

09/25/19

FOCUS AREAS

Infrastructure

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, BEC
SPONSORS

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO)
Federal Highway Administration
National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Sri Sritharan

Faculty Affiliate

About the research

According to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Bridge Design Specifications, minimum reinforcement provisions are intended to reduce the probability of brittle failure by providing flexural capacity greater than the cracking moment. There is a concern with the current AASHTO LRFD minimum flexural reinforcement requirements when it’s applied to pretensioned or post-tensioned concrete flexural members. Increasing the nominal capacity of a member can result in increasing the cracking moment of the same member. This makes the design process iterative, and the current minimum reinforcement requirement for post-tensioned members is difficult to satisfy. This also may lead to less efficient design of pretensioned/post-tensioned concrete flexural members. Provisions for the design of minimum flexural reinforcement must be suitable for all structure and reinforcement types covered by the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications and should be consistent with the LRFD design philosophy. The objective of this research is to propose revisions to the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications minimum flexural reinforcement provisions. The research should consider reinforced, pre-tensioned, and post-tensioned concrete flexural members (e.g., bonded and unbonded tendons for segmentally and other than segmentally constructed bridges).

 

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

09/01/15

END DATE

06/30/18

FOCUS AREAS

Safety

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE
SPONSORS

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Paul Carlson
Co-Principal Investigator
Shauna Hallmark

Director, InTrans

Co-Principal Investigator
Omar Smadi

Director, CTRE

About the research

The objective of this research is to develop a guide for transportation practitioners that describes and evaluates the safety benefits, as shown by driver performance or other methods, of retroreflective pavement markers (RPMs), both raised and recessed, for nighttime driving, particularly during wet weather.

See the NCHRP project page for more information.

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

08/01/14

END DATE

09/30/17

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE, MTC
SPONSORS

Midwest Transportation Center
National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)
USDOT/OST-R

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Glenn Washer

University of Missouri - Columbia

Co-Principal Investigator
Henry Brown

University of Missouri - Columbia

About the research

The objective of this research is to develop guidelines to improve the quality of element-level data collection for bridges on the National Highway System (NHS) in reference to the AASHTO Manual for Bridge Element Inspection.


Funding Sources:
Midwest Transportation Center
National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) ($120,000.00)
USDOT/OST-R ($120,000.00)
Total: $240,000.00

Contract Number: DTRT13-G-UTC37

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

12/31/15

END DATE

08/31/17

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE, PROSPER
SPONSORS

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

PARTNERS

Georgia Tech Research Corporation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Omar Smadi

Director, CTRE

Co-Principal Investigator
Halil Ceylan

Director, PROSPER

Co-Principal Investigator
Yelda Turkan

Transportation Engineer

Co-Principal Investigator
Yi-Chang (James) Tsai

About the research

Many state and local agencies collect downward pavement imagery using highway-speed data collection vehicles. The images are subsequently processed using proprietary semi- or fully-automated crack detection and classification software to identify pavement cracking for use in asset management systems. There are multiple methods and software for defining, classifying, and reporting cracking data. In addition, these methods and the cracking data they produce are not always comparable between states, even if similar data collection and detection technologies are used. One outcome of this situation is that vendors must customize the cracking definitions for each client they serve.

In order to unify data reporting, sharing, and evaluation, standardization of pavement cracking definitions is needed. Research is needed to define cracking measurement terms for uniformity and potential standardization, building upon work done in the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) provisional protocol (PP) 67 and 68. Additionally, research is needed to produce user and system requirements to aid in the future development of production-grade evaluation software for classifying cracking type, extent, and severity. The standard definitions will aid in sharing information among agencies and vendors as well as reporting to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and setting national, state, and local performance goals.

The objective of this research is to develop standard, discrete definitions for common cracking types in flexible, rigid, and composite pavements. The definitions shall classify cracking type, extent, and severity based on information from images collected by highway-speed data collection vehicles, including orientation, length, density, displacement, location, and other relevant factors. The standard definitions shall be used to facilitate comparable measurement and interpretation of pavement cracking in the highway community. The definitions shall be of sufficient detail to serve as the basis for user and system requirements for cracking evaluation software for automated data collection. Application to both existing and emerging image-based data collection technologies shall be considered.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

07/27/16

END DATE

09/26/19

FOCUS AREAS

Infrastructure

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CEER, CTRE
SPONSORS

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Vern Schaefer

Interim Director, CEER

Co-Principal Investigator
Omar Smadi

Director, CTRE

About the research

Implementation of geotechnical asset management (GAM) offers a significant opportunity to improve the general geotechnical practice through the development of design and management approaches that require consideration of the tradeoffs between least risk and life-cycle costs. The product from this work must be an adaptable implementation manual with the necessary template tools for an agency to recognize the benefits of GAM.

The InTrans researchers are subject matter experts on this projects.

See the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) project page for additional information on this project.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

02/22/13

END DATE

03/26/16

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CMAT, CTRE
SPONSORS

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO)
Federal Highway Administration
National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Doug Gransberg

Affiliate Researcher

Co-Principal Investigator
Hyung Seok "David" Jeong

Affiliate Researcher

Co-Principal Investigator
Gary Stanton

About the research

The objective of this research is to develop a guidebook, for use by departments of transportation (DOTs) and other agencies, on estimating transportation project preconstruction services costs. The guidebook is meant to be suitable for formal balloting and acceptance by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Subcommittee on Design through the Technical Committee on Preconstruction Engineering Management and for maintenance and updating by these or other AASHTO groups.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

07/24/09

END DATE

12/31/15

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CEER
SPONSORS

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
David White

Geotechnical Engineer

About the research

Automated machine guidance (AMG) links sophisticated design software with construction equipment to direct the operation of the machinery with a high level of precision, improving the speed and accuracy of the transportation construction process. Because AMG eliminates much of the guesswork, manual control, and labor involved in traditional methods, it improves worker safety and saves agencies and contractors time and money, enhancing their ability to deliver transportation construction projects better, faster, and cheaper. This technology has the potential to improve the overall quality and efficiency of transportation project construction. The objective of this research is to develop guidelines for use of AMG technology for state transportation agency construction projects. The guidelines should (1) include technical procurement specifications for AMG technology; (2) provide guidance on the use of such technology in construction projects; and (3) address the implementation of AMG technology into construction techniques (including the provision of electronic files and models to support the AMG process).
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