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Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

07/01/17

END DATE

06/30/19

SPONSORS

Nebraska Department of Roads

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Anuj Sharma

Research Scientist and Leader, REACTOR

Co-Principal Investigator
Neal Hawkins

Associate Director, InTrans

Co-Principal Investigator
Skylar Knickerbocker

Research Engineer, REACTOR

About the research

Memorial Stadium at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln is the home of the Nebraska Cornhuskers football team. It is commonly referred as the “third-largest city” in Nebraska on game days. The stadium holds the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) record of consecutive sellouts for every game since 1962, a streak of more than 300 games. With the extended capacity of more than 85,000, game days are typically found to impact the travel pattern of Lincoln and its neighboring regions. As a result, improved traffic management strategies need to be undertaken to effectively handle the increased traffic during these days and thereby improve the convenience of the game attendees.

The purpose of this project is to find out the impacts of game day on travel pattern and route choice behaviors. INRIX data available through Nebraska Department of Roads will be used to explore past several years of data to generate travel time reliability curves and thereby estimate shockwave lengths. It is expected that the impacts will vary depending on the schedule and also the opponents.

The project will develop a framework that will provide insights of the possible impacts of the game days and help NDOR to implement active traffic assignment to better effectively manage traffic, and thereby reduce congestion.

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

PROJECT NUMBER

SPR-P1(14) M007

START DATE

07/01/13

END DATE

12/31/15

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE, REACTOR
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration State Planning and Research Funding
Nebraska Department of Roads

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Anuj Sharma

Research Scientist and Leader, REACTOR

About the research

This study developed a systematic approach for using data from multiple sources to provide active traffic management solutions. The feasibility of two active traffic management solutions were analyzed: ramp-metering and real-time crash risk estimation and prediction. Using a combined dataset containing traffic, weather, and crash data, this study assessed crash likelihood on urban freeways and evaluated the economic feasibility of providing a ramp metering solution.

A case study of freeway segments in Omaha, Nebraska, was conducted. The impact of rain, snow, congestion, and other factors on crash risk was analyzed using a binary probit model, and one of the major findings from the sensitivity analysis was that a one-mile-per-hour increase in speed is associated with a 7.5% decrease in crash risk.

FREEVAL was used to analyze the economic feasibility of the ramp metering implementation strategy. A case study of a 6.3 mile segment on I-80 near downtown Omaha showed that, after applying ramp metering, travel time decreased from 9.3 minutes to 8.1 minutes and crash risk decreased by 37.5% during the rush hours. The benefits of reducing travel time and crash cost can easily offset the cost of implementing ramp metering for this road section.

The results from the real-time crash risk prediction models developed for the studied road section are promising. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on different models and different temporal and spatial windows to estimate/predict crash risk. An adaptive boosting (AdaBoost) model using a 10 minute historical window of speeds obtained from 0.25 miles downstream and 0.75 miles upstream was found to be the most accurate estimator of crash risk.

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

07/01/16

END DATE

12/31/17

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE, REACTOR
SPONSORS

Nebraska Department of Roads

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Anuj Sharma

Research Scientist and Leader, REACTOR

Co-Principal Investigator
Neal Hawkins

Associate Director, InTrans

Co-Principal Investigator
Skylar Knickerbocker

Research Engineer, REACTOR

About the research

The objective of this project is to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of the Nebraska Department of Roads’ (NDORs’) probe data stream against fixed infrastructure-mounted sensor data. Based on a critical evaluation of the INRIX stream, the study will highlight key considerations for incorporating the probe data into traffic operations, planning, and management activities.

The scope of the study will be limited to selected freeways and arterial corridors. The accuracy of the data stream will be evaluated under different factors such as roadway type, average vehicle speed or volume, percentage of truck traffic, road segment length, and probe penetration.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

02/01/03

END DATE

12/01/07

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CP Tech Center, CTRE
SPONSORS

American Concrete Pavement Association
Concrete paving industry
Federal Highway Administration
Georgia Department of Transportation
Indiana Department of Transportation
Iowa Department of Transportation
Kansas Department of Transportation
Lousiana Department of Transportation
Michigan Department of Transportation
Minnesota Department of Transportation
Nebraska Department of Roads
New York State Department of Transportation
North Carolina Department of Transportation
North Dakota Department of Transportation
Ohio Department of Transportation
Oklahoma Department of Transportation
South Dakota Department of Transportation
Texas Department of Transportation
Wisconsin Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Jim Grove

PCC Engineer

Co-Principal Investigator
Tom Cackler
Student Researcher(s)
Fatih Bektas

About the research

The objectives of this five-year Transportation Pooled Fund study are to evaluate conventional and new technologies and procedures for testing concrete and concrete materials to prevent material and construction problems that could lead to premature concrete pavement distress, and to develop a suite of tests that provides a comprehensive method of ensuring long-term pavement performance. A preliminary suite of tests to ensure long-term pavement performance has been developed. Shadow construction projects are being conducted to evaluate the preliminary suite of tests. A mobile concrete testing laboratory has been designed and equipped to facilitate the shadow projects. The results of the project are being compiled in a user-friendly field manual, which will be available by summer 2006.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

09/01/04

END DATE

11/30/05

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CEER, CTRE
SPONSORS

Active Minerals
Federal Highway Administration
Iowa Department of Transportation
Kansas Department of Transportation
Nebraska Department of Roads
New York State Department of Transportation
W R Grace
Washington State Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Kejin Wang

PCC Engineer, CP Tech Center

Co-Principal Investigator
David White

Geotechnical Engineer

Co-Principal Investigator
Bob Steffes

PCC Research Engineer, CPTech

Co-Principal Investigator
Surendra Shah
Student Researcher(s)
Jiong Hu
Bekir Yilmaz Pekmezci
Gang Lu
Clinton Halverson

About the research

Over-consolidation is often visible as longitudinal vibrator trails in the surface of concrete pavements constructed using slip-form paving. Concrete research and practice have shown that concrete material selection and mix design can be tailored to provide a good compaction without the need for vibration. However, a challenge in developing self-consolidating concrete for slip-form paving (SF SCC) is that the new SF SCC needs to possess not only excellent self-compactibility and stability before extrusion, but also sufficient “green” strength after extrusion, while the concrete is still in a plastic state. The SF SCC to be developed will not be as fluid as the conventional SCC, but it will (1) be workable enough for machine placement, (2) be self-compacting with minimum segregation, (3) hold shape after extrusion from a paver, and (4) have performance properties (strength and durability) compatible to current pavement concrete.

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new type of SCC for slip-form paving to produce more workable concrete and smoother pavements, better consolidation of the plastic concrete, and higher rates of production. Phase I demonstrated the feasibility of designing a new type of SF SCC that can not only self-consolidate, but also have sufficient green strength. In this phase, a good balance between flowability and shape stability was achieved by adopting and modifying the mix design of self-consolidating concrete to provide a high content of fine materials in the fresh concrete. It was shown that both the addition of fine particles and the modification of the type of plasticizer significantly improve fresh concrete flowability. The mixes used in this phase were also found to have very good shape stability in the fresh state. Phase II will focus on developing a SF SCC mix design in the lab and a performing a trial of the SF SCC in the field. Phase III will include field study, performance monitoring, and technology transfer.

 

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

06/01/92

END DATE

06/01/92

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE
SPONSORS

Midwest Transportation Center
Nebraska Department of Roads

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Patrick McCoy

About the research

None available for this project

 

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