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Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

03/01/05

END DATE

09/30/08

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CP Tech Center, CTRE
SPONSORS

Connecticut Department of Transportation
Federal Highway Administration
Iowa Department of Transportation
Kansas Department of Transportation
New York State Department of Transportation
Ohio Department of Transportation
Slag Cement Association

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Scott Schlorholtz

Faculty Affiliate

Co-Principal Investigator
Doug Hooton

University of Toronto

About the research

The initial phase of this project was conducted to determine whether adding slag cement to concrete mixtures increases the surface scaling caused by the routine application of deicer salt. A total of 28 field sites that included portland cement concrete pavements and bridge decks containing slag cement were evaluated. Laboratory testing was conducted on 6 in. diameter core samples extracted from 12 field sites and 3 subsites, including 6 pavement sites and 6 bridge decks. The laboratory testing program consisted of scaling tests, rapid chloride permeability tests, surface chloride profile tests, and petrographic examination. The results of this study suggest that construction-related issues played a bigger role in the observed scaling performance than did the amount of slag in the concrete mixture.

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

04/24/17

END DATE

10/24/18

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, AMPP
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration State Planning and Research Funding
Ohio Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Ashley Buss

Faculty Affiliate

About the research

Chip seal is widely used as an effective, low-cost preventive maintenance treatment for low-volume roads across Ohio and around the country. In some instances, states have used chip seal on select high-volume roads. In Ohio, local entities who do not utilize the ODOT specification for chip seals, tend to rely on previous in-house experience or contractors to determine materials and construction processes for chip seals. As a result, a variety of different methods have been utilized throughout the state. While some of these have resulted in acceptable and even excellent results, others may have not been as successful. As constraints on local budgets continue to tighten, the need to identify the best chip seal techniques and methods increases.

The goal of this research is to assess the current state of practice for chip sealing on county, township, and municipal-maintained roads. The objective is to develop a matrix of best practices for chip sealing low-volume roads in Ohio and design a study to aid in the future assessment of long-term performance creating protocols for data collection.

The results of this research will provide local officials with enhanced knowledge and understanding of chip sealing practices on local roadways in Ohio. This will enable local transportation engineers to confidently apply chip seal in methods that strive to maximize longevity while being cost effective. Ultimately, this research will provide the foundation for the development of scientifically-based guidance on chip seal practices that will aid locals in managing budgets and ensuring the fiscal integrity of local pavement preservation programs.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

04/30/15

END DATE

01/30/19

FOCUS AREAS

Infrastructure

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CP Tech Center
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration State Planning and Research Funding
Federal Highway Administration-Ohio Division
Ohio Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Peter Taylor

Director, CP Tech Center

About the research

With the ongoing concern about premature cracking of concrete bridge decks that reduces the service life of bridges and results in increased maintenance and replacement costs, this work aimed at assessing the benefits of using lightweight fine aggregate (LWFA) in concrete mixtures to assist the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) in preparing a specification to increase the probability of achieving crack-free, long-lasting bridge decks. A laboratory testing program led to a recommended mix design for implementation on a bridge construction project in Ohio. The design included the use of 50% slag cement and LWFA for internal curing. Construction of two bridge decks involved a control using a conventional mix design and the other containing the recommended mixture. The decks were instrumented and load tested shortly after construction and inspected one year after placement. No differences in structural performance were noted, but there were far fewer cracks in the test deck compared to the control. A life-cycle cost analysis was also conducted and shown that the premium for the recommended mixture would be recovered in reduced maintenance over the life of the bridge.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

PROJECT NUMBER

08-323, TPF(5)169

START DATE

06/01/08

END DATE

01/01/14

FOCUS AREAS

Infrastructure

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, BEC, CTRE
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration Transportation Pooled Fund
Iowa Department of Transportation
Ohio Department of Transportation
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation
Wisconsin Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Brent Phares

Bridge Research Engineer, BEC

About the research

Nationally, there is concern regarding the design, fabrication, and erection of horizontally-curved steel girder bridges due to unpredicted girder displacements, fit-up, and locked-in stresses. One reason for the concerns is that up to one-quarter of steel girder bridges are being designed with horizontal curvature. The concerns are significant enough that a National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) research problem statement was developed and given high priority for funding.

It is also noted that an urgent need exists to reduce bridge maintenance costs by eliminating or reducing deck joints. This can be achieved by expanding the use of integral abutments to include curved girder bridges.

The long-term objective of this effort is to establish guidelines for the use of integral abutments with curved girder bridges. The primary objective of this work was to monitor and evaluate the behavior of six in-service, horizontally-curved, steel-girder bridges with integral and semi-integral abutments. In addition, the influence and behavior of fixed and expansion piers were considered.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

08/07/08

END DATE

01/31/11

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CEER, CTRE
SPONSORS

Ohio Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Jake Bigelow

Bridge Research Specialist

Principal Investigator
David White

Geotechnical Engineer

Principal Investigator
Brent Phares

Bridge Research Engineer, BEC

About the research

Bridge owners have long recognized that the approach pavement at bridges is prone to exhibiting both settlement and cracking, which manifest as the “bump at the end of the bridge.” This deterioration requires considerable on-going maintenance expenditures, added risk to maintenance workers, increased distraction to drivers, reduced steering control, increased damage to vehicles, a negative public perception of the highway system, and a shortened useful bridge life. This problem has recently begun to receive significant national attention, as bridge owners have increased the priority of dealing with this recurring problem. No single factor, in and of itself (individually), leads to significant problems. Rather, it is an interaction between multiple factors that typically leads to problematic conditions. As such, solutions to the problem require interdisciplinary thinking and implementation. The bridge-abutment interface is a highly-complex region and an effective “bump at the end of the bridge” solution must address the structural, geotechnical, hydraulic, and construction engineering disciplines. Various design alternatives, construction practices, and maintenance methods exist to minimize bridge approach settlement, but each has its own drawbacks, such as cost, limited effectiveness, or inconvenience to the public.

The objective of this work is to assist the Ohio Department of Transportation in the development of pre-construction, construction, and post-construction strategies that will help eliminate or minimize the “bump at the end of the bridge.” Implementation of the details and procedures described herein will provide a tangible benefit to both the Ohio Department of Transportation and the traveling public, in the form of smoother bridge transitions, reduced maintenance costs, and a safer driving environment.

As a result of this work, several conclusions and recommendations were made. Generally, these could be grouped into three categories: general, structural, and geotechnical. In some cases, the recommendations may require notable changes to the Ohio Department of Transportation bridge design policy. Suggestions for such changes have been made.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

02/01/03

END DATE

12/01/07

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CP Tech Center, CTRE
SPONSORS

American Concrete Pavement Association
Concrete paving industry
Federal Highway Administration
Georgia Department of Transportation
Indiana Department of Transportation
Iowa Department of Transportation
Kansas Department of Transportation
Lousiana Department of Transportation
Michigan Department of Transportation
Minnesota Department of Transportation
Nebraska Department of Roads
New York State Department of Transportation
North Carolina Department of Transportation
North Dakota Department of Transportation
Ohio Department of Transportation
Oklahoma Department of Transportation
South Dakota Department of Transportation
Texas Department of Transportation
Wisconsin Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Jim Grove

PCC Engineer

Co-Principal Investigator
Tom Cackler
Student Researcher(s)
Fatih Bektas

About the research

The objectives of this five-year Transportation Pooled Fund study are to evaluate conventional and new technologies and procedures for testing concrete and concrete materials to prevent material and construction problems that could lead to premature concrete pavement distress, and to develop a suite of tests that provides a comprehensive method of ensuring long-term pavement performance. A preliminary suite of tests to ensure long-term pavement performance has been developed. Shadow construction projects are being conducted to evaluate the preliminary suite of tests. A mobile concrete testing laboratory has been designed and equipped to facilitate the shadow projects. The results of the project are being compiled in a user-friendly field manual, which will be available by summer 2006.

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