CLOSE OVERLAY
Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

06/01/18

END DATE

08/01/19

SPONSORS

Ready Mixed Concrete Research and Education Foundation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Gordon Smith

Associate Director, CP Tech Center

About the research

The purpose of the Guide to Concrete Trails is to provide guidance to the ready-mixed concrete industry, contractors, design professionals, decision makers, practitioners, and public agencies on the design, construction, and maintenance of concrete trails and paths that help to improve the transportation and recreation opportunities of the general public.

The guide focuses on the development steps, design parameters and options, important elements of construction from subgrade preparation to delivery, use of various and sometimes innovative construction equipment, as well as concrete trail maintenance and repair. Finally, the guide offers case studies from projects located throughout the country on concrete trails of all ages, including various construction methods.

The guide’s goal is to provide comprehensive guidance at a national level. Such guidance is useful for construction of all types of paved recreational trails, including those for biking, running, and walking, and of other pathways such as cart paths on golf courses.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

04/01/07

END DATE

07/24/11

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CP Tech Center, CTRE
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration
Ready Mixed Concrete Research and Education Foundation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Vern Schaefer

Interim Director, CEER

Co-Principal Investigator
Paul Wiegand

Director, SUDAS

Co-Principal Investigator
Kejin Wang

PCC Engineer, CP Tech Center

Co-Principal Investigator
John T. Kevern

University of Missouri - Kansas City

About the research

This report presents the results of the largest and most comprehensive study to date on portland cement pervious concrete (PCPC). It is designed to be widely accessible and easily applied by designers, producers, contractors, and owners.

The project was designed to begin with pervious concrete best practices and then to address the unanswered questions in a systematic fashion to allow a successful overlay project. Consequently, the first portion of the integrated project involved a combination of fundamental material property investigations, test method development, and addressing constructability issues before actual construction could take place. The second portion of the project involved actual construction and long-term testing before reporting successes, failures, and lessons learned.

The results of the studies conducted show that a pervious concrete overlay can be designed, constructed, operated, and maintained. A pervious concrete overlay has several inherent advantages, including reduced splash and spray and reduced hydroplaning potential, as well as being a very quiet pavement. The good performance of this overlay in a particularly harsh freeze-thaw climate, Minnesota, shows pervious concrete is durable and can be successfully used in freeze-thaw climates with truck traffic and heavy snow plowing.

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