CLOSE OVERLAY

Investigation into Shrinkage of High Performance Concrete Used for Iowa Bridge Decks and Overlays – Phase II Shrinkage Control and Field Investigation

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

PROJECT NUMBER

15-540, TR-690

START DATE

07/01/15

END DATE

04/30/19

FOCUS AREAS

Infrastructure

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, BEC
SPONSORS

Iowa Department of Transportation
Iowa Highway Research Board

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Kejin Wang

PCC Engineer, CP Tech

Co-Principal Investigator
Scott Schlorholtz

Faculty Affiliate

Co-Principal Investigator
Sri Sritharan

Faculty Affiliate

About the research

This Phase II research project on the shrinkage behavior of high-performance concrete (HPC) used in Iowa bridge decks and overlays evaluated several concrete mixes, building off or modifying mixes developed in Phase I. Based on shrinkage behavior and mechanical properties, the mixes studied in Phase I were characterized as having either high, medium, or low cracking potential. In the Phase II study, three concrete mixes (Mixes 6, 8, and 2, characterized in Phase I as having high, medium, and low cracking potential, respectively) were selected for further investigation. The selected mixes were modified using three shrinkage control technologies: shrinkage-reducing admixtures (SRAs), cementitious materials (CM), and internal curing (IC) agents, respectively. The modification methods were first studied in a laboratory until the optimal shrinkage behavior of each concrete mix was achieved. Two pairs of the tested concrete mixes (Mixes 6 and 8 with and without modification) were then used in a field investigation on the US 20 over I-35 dual bridge. The mixes were placed side by side for the bridge overlays, which were monitored for about one year with strain gages, temperature and moisture sensors, and regular visual examinations.

The laboratory investigation confirmed positive effects for the concrete shrinkage control technologies used. The laboratory test results also provided specific details for the concrete mix modifications, ensuring optimal concrete performance and shrinkage control. The modifications included the addition of 1.0/1.25 gal/yd3 of SRA in Mix 6, the use of 10% CM reduction for Mix 8, and the use of lightweight fine aggregate as an IC material in Mix 2. The results of the field investigation suggest that environmental conditions on the casting day and the first few days of curing play an important role in the development of concrete properties. Future studies could benefit from a comprehensive stress analysis to better understand the long-term effects of the shrinkage control technologies, as well as further field tests and an extended monitoring time.

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