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Lateral Slide of Multi-Span Bridges: Investigation of Connections and Other Details

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

PROJECT NUMBER

19-691, 19-SPR2-001

START DATE

04/15/19

END DATE

06/30/22

FOCUS AREAS

Infrastructure

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, BEC
SPONSORS

Iowa Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Brent Phares

Bridge Research Engineer, BEC

About the research

Lateral slide-in bridge construction (sometimes referred to as slide-in bridge construction) has gained increasing attention as a viable Accelerated Bridge Construction (ABC) approach. With lateral slide construction, the majority of the bridge superstructure is constructed off alignment, typically parallel to the final position, and usually on a system of temporary works. The construction of this portion of the bridge is often completed while the original bridge is still open to traffic. In some instances, portions of the substructure are also constructed while the original bridge is still open to traffic, a technique designed to further reduce traffic impacts. Common techniques for accomplishing this include building substructure elements outside of the original bridge footprint as well as using innovative techniques to complete construction under the bridge with consideration of clearance limitations, stability of the underlying soil, and others. Once the construction of the superstructure is essentially complete, the original bridge is demolished and new substructure construction is completed. Then, usually over a relatively short period time (hours to a day commonly), the new bridge superstructure is slid laterally from the temporary worksite onto the in-place substructure.

The Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) previously completed the lateral side construction of a single span bridge and has developed connection details to facilitate the construction of a bridge in this manner. Now, the Iowa DOT plans to construct a multi-span bridge using slide-in construction techniques, which has raised several questions. The addition of more spans creates a more complex system that will require connections (and other details) that were previously not needed in a single span slide. Further, the fact that the multi-span bridge will need to slide on abutments plus piers (as opposed to just abutments in a single span case) creates possible uplift and overturning scenarios.

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