CLOSE OVERLAY

Prepare Local Agencies for V2V/V2I and Connected Vehicle Technologies

Project Details
STATUS

In-Progress

START DATE

02/21/18

END DATE

05/31/19

FOCUS AREAS

Safety

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, Iowa LTAP
SPONSORS

Minnesota Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
David Veneziano

Safety Circuit Rider, LTAP

About the research

Connected vehicle technologies hold the potential to produce a number of safety, mobility, and environmental benefits for the users and operators of the nation’s surface transportation system. These technologies, which include vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V), use the wireless exchange of data to allow vehicles to communicate between one another and with highway infrastructure.

The benefits of connected vehicle technologies are expected to be wide ranging and apply not only to roadway users but also transportation agencies. These benefits include to reduced crashes, improved mobility, and reduced emissions, among other benefits. Local transportation agencies, such as counties and cities, which manage a significant portion of the Minnesota roadway network, can be expected to be impacted by the transition to connected vehicle technologies. These agencies can also expect to benefit from connected vehicle technologies, through a reduced need to construct roadway infrastructure (through improved mobility), increased fleet safety (e.g., maintenance vehicles), and other benefits.

However, there is a need for local agencies to not only understand what the potential benefits of connected vehicle technologies are, but also how they should be preparing for the transition to such technologies for the infrastructure and fleets that they manage. This project will summarize what infrastructure and technologies are necessary for local agencies to develop and deploy in order support research, development, and implementation of connected vehicle technologies on their systems.

TOP