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Project Details
STATUS

Completed

PROJECT NUMBER

TPF-5(132)

START DATE

06/17/08

END DATE

08/31/12

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CTRE
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration Transportation Pooled Fund
Minnesota Department of Transportation

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Chris Williams

Director, AMPP

About the research

The Institute for Transportation (InTrans) at Iowa State University was a subcontractor to the Minnesota Department of Transportation on this transportation pooled fund study (TPF-5(132)). InTrans researchers made signifinant contributions on this project and links to the project pages are provided here.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

11/01/09

END DATE

03/31/16

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CP Tech Center, CTRE
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration Transportation Pooled Fund
TPF-5(224)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Peter Taylor

Director, CP Tech Center

About the research

Premature deterioration of concrete at the joints in concrete pavements and parking lots has been reported across the northern states. The distress may first appear as shadowing when microcracking near the joints traps water, or as cracks parallel to and about 1 inch from the saw cut. The distress later exhibits as a significant loss of material. Not all roadways are distressed, but the problem is common enough to warrant attention.

The aim of the work being conducted under this and parallel contracts was to improve understanding of the mechanisms behind premature joint deterioration and, based on this understanding, develop training materials and guidance documents to help practitioners reduce the risk of further distress and provide guidelines for repair techniques.

While work is still needed to understand all of the details of the mechanisms behind premature deterioration and the prevention of further distress, the work to date has contributed to advancing the state of the knowledge.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

START DATE

09/16/10

END DATE

07/25/12

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, CP Tech Center, CTRE
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration Transportation Pooled Fund
TPF-5(224)

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Peter Taylor

Director, CP Tech Center

About the research

Premature deterioration of concrete at the joints in concrete pavements and parking lots has been reported across the northern states. The distress is first observed as shadowing when microcracking near the joints traps water, later exhibiting as significant loss of material. Not all roadways are distressed, but the problem is common enough to warrant attention.

The aim of the work being conducted under this and parallel contracts was to improve understanding of the mechanisms behind premature joint deterioration and, based on this understanding, develop training materials and guidance documents to help practitioners reduce the risk of further distress and provide guidelines for repair techniques.

While work is still needed to understand all of the details of the mechanisms behind premature deterioration and prevention of further distress, the work in this report and guide has contributed to advancing the state of knowledge.

Project Details
STATUS

Completed

PROJECT NUMBER

10-367, TPF-5(219)

START DATE

03/01/10

END DATE

01/22/20

FOCUS AREAS

Infrastructure

RESEARCH CENTERS InTrans, BEC
SPONSORS

Federal Highway Administration Transportation Pooled Fund
Iowa Department of Transportation

PARTNERS

SHM Pooled Fund

Researchers
Principal Investigator
Brent Phares

Bridge Research Engineer, BEC

About the research

Bridges constitute the most expensive assets, by mile, for transportation agencies around the US and the world. Most of the bridges in the US were constructed between the 1950s and the 1970s. Consequently, an increasing number of bridges are getting old and requiring much more frequent inspections, repairs, or rehabilitations to keep them safe and functional. However, due to constrained construction and maintenance budgets, bridge owners are faced with the difficult task of balancing the condition of their bridges with the cost of maintaining them.

Bridge maintenance strategies depend upon information used to estimate future condition and remaining life of bridges. The desire of many departments of transportation (DOTs) is to augment their existing inspection process and maintenance system with a system that can objectively and more accurately quantify the state of bridge health in terms of condition and performance, aid in inspection and maintenance activities, and estimate the remaining life of their bridge inventory in real time. To better manage bridge inventories, tools that can accurately predict the future condition of a bridge, as well as its remaining life, are required.

One of the key requirements for an effective infrastructure management system is the establishment of a structural health monitoring (SHM) system An SHM system traditionally consists of a network of monitoring sensors, data acquisition, and communication hardware and software capable of carrying out bridge condition assessments in real-time and accurately and objectively predicting the health of the infrastructure components and systems.

For this project, the research team developed an automated SHM system that could detect bridge damage and estimate load ratings of bridges, as well as models to develop predictions for future condition ratings of bridges. The SHM system and models were then used to develop a bridge maintenance prioritization system for DOTs to augment current bridge management practices.

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